Browsing Tag

travel

Does Your Hotel Have A Story?

February 23, 2016 • By

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There’s nothing as captivating as a good story. A story that lures you in, gets you engaged and compels you to do something.

There’s a reason why "storytelling" has been one of the biggest buzzwords for hotel marketers the past few years. Travelers aren’t drawn to facts, promises of a wonderful stay or mentions of your recent industry awards. They want to be a part of something that intrigues them, connects with them and gives them something to brag about.

Consistently and creatively telling your story is what can truly attract travelers to you. However, it’s a common problem for many hoteliers to not know what their story is, much less how to convey it. So… we’re here to help.

Here’s our quick guide on determining your hotel’s story:

1. Know Who You Are

Who are you? Why does your property exist? It’s simple to get lost in the nitty gritty of marketing the facts about your hotel. But correctly telling your story means taking a step back and nailing down your identity first so that you can convey it poignantly across all your marketing channels.

Couples Resorts, a collection of luxury, all-inclusive and couples-only resorts in Jamaica, poignantly captures the allure of a romantic seaside getaway in the tropics. Its carefully curated photos of couples sharing remarkable moments to a backdrop of aqua-hued waters and cloudless skies will make people yearn for their own intimate escape to paradise. Meanwhile, its short and to-the-point marketing copy lays claim to their brand promise: "No kids. No singles. No hassles.”

2. Know Your Audience

Who stays at your property? What do they care about? Are they adventure seekers or business people… or both? Determine what’s relevant to these groups, what they want in travel experiences and what concerns them. In your marketing campaigns, highlight what is relevant to them, use language that they would use and showcase reviews and images that resonate with their personas.

3. Showcase the Awesome

Now, determine the most exciting and most interesting assets your hotel has to offer. After all, your guests aren’t booking a stay with you because you’re the most boring and blandest property on the block. What’s intriguing? Is it your location next to a landmark? Is it your history? Your architecture? Your fun family programs? Leave out the details that no one cares about, like all the awards you’ve won or your cliché guarantees for a great stay.

The Cliff House in Colorado thoughtfully immerses its audience in the awe-inspiring brilliance of its mountain surroundings and its Wild West history. This property draws upon its location between two of Colorado’s natural showpieces – the Garden of the Gods and Pikes Peak – to showcase a hotel experience that will brim of outdoor adventures and escapades. Plus the hotel’s impactful photos of their 1800’s architecture captures the property’s alluring history as a stagecoach stop, letting future guests know that their stay will be a remarkable one.

4. Get the Word Out

Now that you’ve nailed down your story, you have to tell the tale.

Your story should be woven into all of your sales and marketing materials. Give your prospects a consistent memorable handle on your property! Every marketing touchpoint — your hotel website design, your email, every social media post, every marketing photo — should convey and reinforce your hotel’s story.

5. Get in Touch With Your Feelings

The best stories go beyond mere recitation of facts and touch on people’s emotions. How will your property make them FEEL? Will business travelers and corporate warriors feel empowered by your property’s location and tech-savvy amenities? Will families be able to bond over the bonfire and hot chocolate each night? You want your audience to feel something from your marketing. This is what compels them to book.

About Tambourine

Tambourine uses technology and creativity to increase revenue for hotels and destinations worldwide. The firm, now in its 33rd year, is located in New York City and Fort Lauderdale. Please visit: www.Tambourine.com

Are You A Hotel Marketing Groundhog?

January 27, 2016 • By

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Next week is Groundhog Day.

According to the tradition, a clairvoyant groundhog in Pennsylvania named “Punxsutawney Phil” cautiously emerges from his cozy hideout each year. If Phil sees his shadow and returns to his hole, he predicts six more weeks of winter. If Phil does not see his shadow, he predicts an early spring.

It’s a silly holiday, but a helpful symbolic event for many hotel marketers. After all, you can’t lead your property if you’re hunkered down in your hole or sitting behind your desk, stuck behind closed doors returning emails and analyzing spreadsheets.

Let the brilliance shine and spring into action. Here are three smart ways to get out of that winter rut: 

1. Get out and talk to people… yes, really talk.

Build time each and everyday to walk your property. Chat with guests, find out why they’re visiting, how they found your property, how they’re enjoying their stay and if there is anything that could have been done to improve their experience.

Do the same with your conference space – walk the hallways and mingle with the event planning team and the attendees. Not only can this daily socializing unearth issues that would normally go unnoticed, but also queue up ideas for future marketing campaigns, ancillary services and unique amenities that you would never have discovered being holed up in your office.

2. Review compset properties that are outperforming yours.

Scour their website and, if time permits, stop by for a visit. Find out what they’re offering that your hotel isn’t. What is their staff doing differently? What makes their experience outshine yours? Take a look at what their guests are saying on TripAdvisor, how the hotel is responding and how they communicate on their social media channels. What promotions are they running, what packages do they offer, what are they offering meeting planners?

Read: 6 Ways for Hotel Marketers to Keep An Eye On Their Comp Set

3. Create an authentic, local experience.

If you can’t upgrade your physical property, then enhance your hotel’s programming and destination experience. 

Today’s travelers are hungry for one-of-a-kind experiences, so build packages around immersive activities that give them a true sense of place. What are the locally inspired gems in your neighborhood? Where do the locals love to go? We’re not talking about the famous, big-ticket attractions that everyone already knows about in your destination. We’re talking about the small farm tours, the food tastings at a family-owned restaurant or winery, the tours run by a locally owned tour company.

About Tambourine

Tambourine uses technology and creativity to increase revenue for hotels and destinations worldwide. The firm, now in its 33rd year, is located in New York City and Fort Lauderdale. Please visit: www.Tambourine.com

Want More Hotel Revenue? Start Selling Your Destination.

October 21, 2015 • By

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Within the last five years, the term "travel like a local" has resurfaced as a resounding credo among modern travelers. Travelers no longer seek souvenirs, they covet unique experiences. Today, leisure and business guests are spending their hard-earned travel dollars on hotels where they’ll have front-row access to authentic, locally inspired experiences – not simply a room with a bed.

In Google’s recent report, "The Traveler’s Road to Decision," the search engine giant revealed that destination-related terms far surpassed brand name searches when consumers began to plan their travels.

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Forward-thinking hoteliers are responding to this new hunger for local experiences by moving beyond their traditional normal hotel marketing efforts. 

Besides the major attractions that get top billing in your city, what guests really want to know is:

What’s right outside your front door? What can they walk to? Where can they find the best local fare? Where can they catch a good happy hour? What’s a good running route? Where can they buy locally made items they won’t find anywhere else?

The good news is that you can quickly and easily remedy your hotel’s deficiency on local and neighborhood content.

Follow these tips to turn your hotel internet marketing efforts into magnets for experiential travelers:

1. Create Content Focused on Your Immediate Neighborhood

Whatever neighborhood you are in, own it.

Become synonymous with your neighborhood. One of the major allures of Airbnb is that it allows travelers to "live like locals" in neighborhoods that are off the beaten tourist track. But, hotels can do that as well. Create a page on your website dedicated just to your immediate neighborhood (or a downloadable/printable PDF). Got a cool winebar around the corner? Flaunt it. Are you within walking distance to a lake where the locals go jogging each evening? Share it. Write blog posts, post pics to Instagram, and upload videos to YouTube of one-of-a-kind things to experience in your neighborhood.

Read: Three Ways Hotel Marketers Can Tap Into The Authenticity Trend

2. Offer Secret Tips for Major Attractions

Yes, guests DO want to know about your city’s major attractions. But, stand out by giving them more than the same generic information they can find on every other hotel’s website or from the attraction themselves. Instead, share what every traveler covets: Local secrets and Staff Picks (handpicked recommendations from your local employees).

Replace the often-used attraction descriptions that are currently on your website with:

- How can travelers save money at the big attraction?

- How they can save time?

- Where can they find free parking?

- What is the best day and time to visit?

- Is there a less crowded entrance?

- Is there a more local alternative (such as the Columbia Tower vs. the Space Needle)?

- What’s worth seeing and what’s worth skipping?

- What’s worth the splurge?

3. Look Beyond the Concierge Desk

Notice that we haven’t mentioned your concierge once until this paragraph. That’s because hotels lean way too much on concierges as their sole destination experts. The truth is, modern travelers are smart. They know that most concierges won’t give them the "true story." Sadly, concierges will often point them to a restaurant that is ‘safe’ or ‘good for tourists’, while rarely mentioning the ‘hole in the wall’ that locals are raving about on Yelp.

Some attractions even award concierges with commissions for sending travelers their way. Plus, concierges don’t work around the clock and there is usually just one at the concierge desk anyhow.

So, to supplement your concierges’ destination expertise…

4. Turn ALL Frontline Staff into Neighborhood Experts

Again, this is where Airbnb shines. The local host lives and breathes their neighborhood. They chose to live there. They frequent the businesses there daily. They know where to go and how to get there. Unfortunately, many hotel staffers are not true local hosts. They may not live in the same neighborhood as the hotel they work at… Instead, they live 30 minutes away and rarely – if ever – frequent the neighborhood your hotel is in.

Nonetheless, travelers are depending on your hotel staff to be locals. If a guest asks, “Where is the best coffee around?”, your staff’s answer should not be, “Well, we have a Starbucks cart in the lobby” or “I don’t know, you should ask the concierge.”

Take the time and allocate the funds to have frontline staff experience the neighborhood themselves. Head to Yelp, have staff visit eateries and shops that have the highest ratings. Or, make a competition out of it. Create a checklist of neighborhood experiences and whichever staff member submits selfies of themselves at each place first wins a prize.

5. Create Packages With One-of-a-Kind Local Experiences

Look to small vendors offering immersive local experiences to supplement your regular room and attraction ticket packages. Local experiences could be a meal at a family-owned ethnic restaurant, farm tours, tastings at mom-and-pop businesses, tours or scavenger hunts by a small local company. 

About Tambourine

Tambourine uses technology and creativity to increase revenue for hotels and destinations worldwide. The firm, now in its 33rd year, is located in New York City and Fort Lauderdale. Please visit: www.Tambourine.com

The Most Popular Hotel Marketing Blog Posts of Last Year

January 8, 2014 • By

TambourineMostPopularBlogPostsThe most popular hotel marketing blog posts of last year.

Want good advice? Ask a crowd. The wisdom of crowds is usually accurate. So by taking a look back at our stats from last year’s blog posts, we can measure which topics were most compelling and relevant to hotel marketing folks round the world. Last January, a post on hotel social media from Tom McDermott, advised hoteliers to remember that every guest touchpoint is an opportunity for social interaction. From the pillow quality to the elevator experience, Tom reminded us that guests will evangelize or criticize in real time! In March, we launched the Numbers for Ninjas series with a post about the easily- forgotten importance of OTAs “billboard effect” on hotels’ DIRECT booking revenues! And a sobering stat on how much OTAs are costing US hotels. Readers also voiced their approval of an article on the growing importance of tablets in direct hotel bookings. Consumers surf and search more on phones (due to their greater market penetration), but convert to real bookings much more often on tablets… reminding hotel marketers that a tablet-specific website will ROI quickly! Dave Spector’s series on the importance and easy availability of “little data” was also extremely popular with readers. Part I gave tips on using readily available stats to improve revenues, while Part II revealed other free sources of data many hotels overlook. Our most popular hotel marketing blog of the year came in December: “What do Hotel Marketers want for Christmas?” was clicked, read and shared more than any other post in 2013. The survey results showed some surprising things on hotel marketers’ wish lists! Check out all the posts at Tambourine’s hotel marketing blog and let us know which ones are valuable to you!

About Tambourine

Tambourine drives revenue for hotels and destinations worldwide using advanced marketing technology. The firm is celebrating its 30-year anniversary. For more information, visit Tambourine.com.

Recent studies suggest that our friends' social media activity has a growing influence on our travel purchasing behavior.

May 14, 2013 • By
Tambourine11%NumbersforNingasRecent studies suggest that our friends' social media activity has a growing influence on our travel purchasing behavior. Seeing friends' posts/likes on Facebook, reviews on Trip Advisor or pictures on Instagram significantly deepens consumer interest. And why not? We trust our friends and family's opinion and take comfort in their advocacy (83% of TripAdvisor respondents said that they trust a travel recommendation from friends and family).

How does this affect your marketing?

Here's a few suggestions:

  1. Publish compelling content. It's "social" media, not "sales media." The more interesting your content, more fans will interact and share it.
  2. Accelerate social evangelism by utilizing advanced tools like Flip.to, which enables new bookers to share their itinerary with their friends right inside your booking process.
  3. Hypertarget on Facebook: the largest social network now enables you to target friends of your fans or, target past guests (by their email address), encouraging them to become fans if they haven't already
  4. Invite reviews on Trip Advisor: The review giant just launched a new tool called ReviewExpress. The simple tool enables you to email past guests and ask them to post a review on TripAdvisor.
However you are using social media, it's all good… its the greatest free channel to travel marketers ever invented. Stay focused on delivering a great product experience and your delighted guests will become your greatest marketing asset, attracting their friends and family at no added cost.

Expedia's revenue growth over the same period last year was 24%.

May 10, 2013 • By
Tambourine: Numbers for NinjasThis amazing stat brings up a number of issues for hotel marketers. First, how do your results compare to Expedia's? Sure they have bigger budgets, deeper resources and global markets, but their primary growth is coming from surging travel demand. Are your sales in sync? Next, even more depressing, is the sobering fact that Expedia's most recent financial report reveals that the percentage of overall revenue it spends on marketing is growing faster than its revenue growth! Did you increase your marketing spend by 24% last Q? If not, Expedia may take an even bigger bite out of your bottom line in the future!

Why Isn't Your Hotel on Instagram? 7 reasons to use Instagram

November 26, 2012 • By
One of the biggest challenges in social media marketing is figuring out how to create engaging content on a limited and sometimes non-existent social media marketing budget. And it’s the same story whether you are a 500 room hotel or a 10 room hotel. So when a free tool like Instagram comes along and levels the playing field in terms of generating on-the-fly, trendy and engaging content, get down on your knees and thank the marketing gods, because a large part of your content woes have just been solved.

7 reasons your hotel should be using Instagram:

#1 It’s cool. And never underestimate the value of cool. It’s super cool. It is. Sorry Instahaters. Snap a photo. Crop it. And apply a cool filter. Don’t ask me to explain the science behind it, but suddenly you’ve got a visually stimulating photo that doesn’t embarrass your brand like those out of date lifestyle photos. #2 It’s good content. And good content is hard to come by. Any social media strategist will tell you that the hardest thing about their job is generating good content to represent the brand. And for image centric social platforms like Facebook and Pinterest that call for daily doses of quality imagery, Instagram is a godsend, allowing you to fill out that Pinterest profile with content specific, original photography that that links back to your property. #3 It’s unique to your hotel. Finally, you can stop sharing that other hotel’s cool content. Your hotel’s Facebook page should have a steady flow of trendy content showing off your hotel’s unique style, not to mention the many wonders of the surrounding city. Stop admiring that other hotel’s trendy, hip Facebook page. Highlight the unique details of your own property. It’s not just about snapping that generic photo of a guest’s arrival. That’s good. But it could also be about that guest’s vintage luggage, automobile. or a variety of other hotel accouterment: the luxury soaps, the architecture, the stationary, the artwork, the food. The best content is always the content that is specific to your hotel and surrounding city. The more odd and unique, the better. Instagram gives you the tools to show it off. #4 It’s candid. Okay, maybe it isn’t. But if feels that way. Instagram photos have a special way of feeling like captured moments, even when they aren’t. Staged lifestyle photography seems to be the last thing fans want in a social platform, because people don’t want to feel that they are being advertised to. They want to feel like you are a part of their culture and speaking their language. In a way, Instagram is a very, very popular language. By Instagraming the photo, you are taking that necessary step away from being glossy and obvious about your social advertising techniques. #5 It’s available. You don’t have to train anyone to use it.  Instagram is free and every employee probably has the app installed on their phone. Host employee competitions, guest competitions, or pass the Iphone around at guest events to document the experience. If you don't have a smart phone, make the investment already. You should have a good cell phone by now anyway.   #6 It’s another opportunity to engage. And right now, engagement is king. Instagram boasts 30 million plus Registered Users and 5 million plus Photos Uploaded Per Day. Everyday there are people posting photos relevant to your city and in some cases your hotel. Each photo is an opportunity to engage with individuals. Like a photo, comment on a pretty picture, you’ll be surprised to find users far more willing to interact with you. On Instagram you aren’t disrupting a conversation. Instead, you’re paying a compliment. Users might react negatively if a big brand chimes in on a conversation they’re having with their friend on Twitter, but users don’t generally mind if a brand tells them that they took a pretty photo. Dollars to donuts they’ll be flattered you noticed and follow you back. #7 It’s inspiring conversation about travel.  Instagram adds an exciting new element to travel, because you don’t have to be a professional photographer to snap a photo that you’re going to be happy with. Every tourist is now a photo-tourist. They’re taking pictures of your property. They’re taking pictures of the destination. And their hashtagging the heck out of them. And because these photos have trendy, cool filters, these photos are going to paint your destination or property in a trendy and cool light. Instagram does to travel photography pretty much everything you want it to do. It inspires travel. Thomas McDermott is the Social Media Manager at Tambourine.
About Tambourine: Tambourine is an ROI-obsessed marketing agency driving demand, revenue and brand awareness for travel and leisure clients since 1986. The Company creates inspiring digital experiences and engaging campaigns that produce measurable results. Based in South Florida and New York City, Tambourine recently received Gold and Platinum Adrian and Magellan awards, the largest and most prestigious travel marketing competitions, representing this year’s top marketing campaigns from across the global hospitality industry. We are the instrument many of the world’s most advanced marketers use to create a steady beat of traffic and revenue growth. We provide a 360º integrated marketing program that delivers predictable ROI and a sustainable sales and marketing rhythm for your brand. Learn more at https://www.Tambourine.com

Are you a hotel marketing Dinosaur? Eight ways to avoid extinction.

November 12, 2012 • By
Hotel Marketing Dinosaur My partner and I attended a fancy dinner at a major tourism conference recently. We were seated next to the GM and Director of Sales & Marketing for a fairly large independent resort. When they asked about our Company we explained that we helped hoteliers increase direct bookings using advanced digital marketing techniques. They nodded and smiled and exchanged curious glances at each other. After our brief explanation... and a long awkward pause, the GM asked with genuine sincerity: "Isn't that what we pay the OTAs for?" That incident proves that some hotel marketers are still stuck in the past when it comes to marketing... using the same old techniques their competition are using year after year. By failing to evolve, these hotel marketing "dinosaurs" are endangering their property owner's investments and their own livelihoods. Are you evolving and using new marketing techniques to drive revenue at the lowest possible cost? Here's eight ways to avoid becoming a hotel marketing dinosaur:
  1. Embrace your inner geek: Marketing and technology are more intertwined than ever. Understanding the systems that impact your marketing results (PMS, CRM, CRS, GDS, Delphi, Google Analytics, Omniture, etc), their differences and outputs are critical to staying ahead of the competition and bolstering the confidence of your owners/management.
  2. Flip your OTA ratio How do you explain to your boss that someone else does a better job of marketing your property than you do? Stop overpaying the OTAs to siphon your revenues. Reserve (and guarantee) your best rates for your own site. Launch your own marketing initiatives that drive direct bookings on your website. OTAs can still send incremental bookings, but more should come from your own website than the OTAs!
  3. Harness the power of CRM PMS and CRM systems offer hotel marketers a treasure trove of data about past guests. Who are your best guests based on recency, frequency and monetary value? Who spends more in the spa on summer weekdays? Dig into your data and you'll gain valuable insight into your guests' behavior... which you can use to generate relevant promos that drive repeat visits.
  4. Learn to love stats ADR, RevPar and AOR are important industry metrics, but more and more owners want to hear about MCPS (marketing cost per sale), ROAS (return on ad spend), look-to-book ratios, availability checks, bounce rates and other KPIs (key performance indicators) of your marketing performance. Develop a list (less than 5) of the key marketing indicators signaling future success or weakness for your property.
  5. Be social (online): We monitor/manage Facebook and TripAdvisor for many hotels, but we also know dozens of GMs (and owners!) who personally manage the day-to-day postings on their properties' social pages. They love sharing current events and communicating with their ever growing base of fans and friends. They also field complaints directly. By monitoring and participating in your social media activities, you'll give guests a sense of transparency, honesty, authentic local events and personal on-site management attention.
  6. Be social (offline): Whether your hotel is in a city center, a remote island or rural town, connecting with relevant neighbors is essential to becoming a thriving member of the local ecosystem. Get to know the leaders at nearby cultural centers, attractions and large companies. If these folks know your property and know you, they'll include you in their own planning... driving unlimited direct bookings revenue at virtually no cost!
  7. Don't wait for the flag: When you pay for the rights to fly a well-known flag over your hotel, you're paying primarily for marketing resources driven by a remote team of folks at the brand-level who often have to service hundreds of properties like yours at the same time. If you're not getting fast turnaround times, compelling materials and measurable results.... take matters into your own hands. When the time comes to report to your owners, you don't want to say: "we missed our numbers and I'm waiting for the brand team to fix it!"
  8. Break the clutter: Research shows that consumers see more than 2,000 marketing messages every day. Why should they respond to yours? If it's not provocative, or fails to communicate a unique benefit... chances are you will see no ROI. Your marketing should be memorable, likeable, persuasive and truthful. Your marketing messages should showcase compelling photography and always, always offer a meaningful CTA (call to action) that leads to a frictionless direct booking experience (phone and/or web).
Ultimately, dinosaurs disappeared because they couldn't adapt to the changes in their environment. Hopefully, the easy suggestions above will help you avoid the same fate. Dave Spector is a Partner at Tambourine. About Tambourine: Tambourine is an ROI-obsessed marketing agency driving demand, revenue and brand awareness for travel and leisure clients since 1986. The Company creates inspiring digital experiences and engaging campaigns that produce measurable results. Based in South Florida and New York City, Tambourine recently received Gold and Platinum Adrian and Magellan awards, the largest and most prestigious travel marketing competitions, representing this year’s top marketing campaigns from across the global hospitality industry. We are the instrument many of the world’s most advanced marketers use to create a steady beat of traffic and revenue growth. We provide a 360º integrated marketing program that delivers predictable ROI and a sustainable sales and marketing rhythm for your brand. Learn more at https://www.Tambourine.com

Fantasy Tourism: New Zealand Embraces the Hobbit

October 23, 2012 • By
New Zealand is putting its pop cultural capital to work with their new marketing campaign, New Zealand: 100% Middle Earth. 100% Pure. Watch it here. As home to the Lord of the Rings Trilogy and the soon to come Hobbit Films, New Zealand's new tourism commercial combines fantastical imagery and an overly imaginative history that boasts New Zealand as "A land where giant eagles once guarded the skies," "Where creatures dwell in ancient caves," and "Where you can play on mountains protected by gods." This bold take on destination travel begs a very interesting question: Is there room for fantasy in destination marketing? With the incredible size of the LOTR films, not to mention the literary relevance of the popular novels turned into even more popular films, as well as the iconic mountainsides, hobbit villages and massive set pieces built into the landscape, it only makes sense that New Zealand embrace these picture perfect tourism locals and cultural real estate as assets, complete with a built in audience. New Zealand is indeed a unique case, but I wonder how other destinations might translate this unique value proposition and embrace the fantastical? A rather unsuccessful variation of this fantasy concept is the new campaign for Peru Tourism titled: Peru: Empire of Hidden Treasures. Watch it here: The spot presents Peru as an "ancestral culture, chosen by Gods to harbor one of the greatest civilizations in the history of man." Packaged in the guise of a movie trailer, the spot is structured as a campy, hollywood blockbuster, complete with deep voiced narrator. Though it tries very hard to hit the right beats, the epic nature of the voice over doesn't quite suit the visuals and, in fact, feels a bit like a mockery of Peru, instead of a breathtaking visual tour that evokes a desire to see it in person. In short, it seems as though it is simply trying too hard. It seems that these high concept, fantastical campaigns come in direct response to what has been a growing and very popular trend of creating very true to life, dare I say documentary, journeys told as compelling cinematic stories with emotional hooks and raw, naturalistic visuals. A very successful example of this, in this writer's opinion, is the Incredible India Campaign in which a lone backpacker fumbles through remarkable day to day experiences while traveling on foot, on camel, on motorcycle, on river raft and on elephant. You can watch it here. It's hard to resist to the down-to-earth comedic charm mixed with breathtaking landscapes and unheard of experiences. Though this vacation experience is not for the faint of heart, but rather a dirty, gritty adventure, it still speaks to this idea of relatable experience. But as more and more travel brands begin to duplicate this documentary feel, the creative real-estate may begin to wear thin, leading quite naturally towards a need for the fantastical. In this great effort to convey value, New Zealand appears to have adopted a seemingly false history, mixing in the pop-cultural folklore of the Lord of the Rings with some of their own culture and folklore. This cultural mash up seems only acceptable because of how powerfully The Lord of the Rings infiltrated our culture in general. The campaign successfully plays upon the viewers pre-established interests, and manages to retain a sense of truth, despite its fantastical elements. This is a truth sadly not evident in Peru's campaign, and it appears that the success of creatively manipulating and presenting a destination's culture and history relies not in the conception, but in the execution. No one will complain about a creative photo editor combining the perfect sky from one photo and the perfect beach from another if the image is beautiful in the end and conveys some measure of emotional truth. I see New Zealand's successful campaign as opening the gateway to some very interesting possibilities where destination marketers reach deep into the cultural heritage and folklore of a destination to find fresh, creative messaging, and harnessing the magic of great cinema, present these ideals in exciting ways. After all, what is this idea of travel if not a culmination of moments and feelings that live deep in our imaginations? We still want to believe in far off lands we have not seen, where we will likely have experiences we cannot quite articulate. We want someone to tell us that these places still exist. That we, in fact, have not seen it all. And where some are moved by the illusion of love and adventure on a sun drenched beach at dusk, some are moved by the fabled history of hobbits nestled peacefully in a country hillside. About Tambourine: Tambourine is an ROI-obsessed marketing agency driving demand, revenue and brand awareness for travel and leisure clients since 1986. The Company creates inspiring digital experiences and engaging campaigns that produce measurable results. Based in South Florida and New York City, Tambourine recently received Gold and Platinum Adrian and Magellan awards, the largest and most prestigious travel marketing competitions, representing this year’s top marketing campaigns from across the global hospitality industry. We are the instrument many of the world’s most advanced marketers use to create a steady beat of traffic and revenue growth. We provide a 360º integrated marketing program that delivers predictable ROI and a sustainable sales and marketing rhythm for your brand. Learn more at https://www.Tambourine.com